Walk the Talk for Energy on Saturday

Caricom Energy Month Logo Theme 2017

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Energy Programme will hold its Regional Energy Kilo-walk on November 25, 2017 at 6 am from the CARICOM Secretariat, Turkeyen, Greater Georgetown, Guyana.

Under the slogan ‘Re-Thinking Energy – Shaping a Resilient Community: Walk the talk’ participants from the length and breadth of Guyana, across all differences, will attend the event as we seek to highlight the role of citizens in securing their own sustainable energy future by providing information on the steps that can be taken to empower them to do so.

Updated Kilowalk Poster

The event, which is a part of the series of planned activities in observance of CARICOM Energy Month 2017, aims to target a wide cross-section of society and is expected to provide a platform to increase awareness on sustainable energy matters as well as the efforts of the CARICOM Energy Programme, the Government of Guyana and the Guyana Energy Agency.

The walk will commence from the Arthur Chung Convention Centre westward, turning right onto Conversation Tree and along the Rupert Craig Highway to UG road, then heading west along the Railway Embankment and concluding at the CARICOM Secretariat Headquarters where participants will reassemble for a short programme and refreshments.

The event is expected to be attended by officials from the various Ministries, members of the Diplomatic Corp, members of staff, representative from various NGO’s, youth groups and the public.

Please see Kilo-Walk Programme

 

CDB to promote resilient recovery, climate action for Caribbean at COP23

Dr. Warren Smith, President of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)

November 13, 2017, BONN, Germany – A delegation from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) has arrived at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) in Bonn, Germany. While at the event, which runs until November 17, the Bank will join other regional stakeholders in reiterating the urgent need for climate action and resilient recovery in the Caribbean. Against the backdrop of this year’s devastating hurricane season, CDB will also underscore its commitment to mobilising highly concessionary resources for regional countries to tackle the impacts of climate change.

 “We are pleased to add our voice to the global conversation on climate action, given the vulnerability of the low-lying and coastal states in the Caribbean Region. At COP23, our priority is to continue to draw attention to the very real challenges our small states are facing as a result of climate change; to strengthen partnerships to combat those challenges; and to further engage stakeholders as our Region seeks to ‘build back better’,” said Dr. Wm. Warren Smith, President of CDB.

While in Bonn, the Bank will sign a US$24M agreement with the European Investment Bank for post-disaster reconstruction. It is an addition to the US$120M Climate Action Framework Loan II signed in May this year.

Caribbean Development Bank
The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), is a regional financial institution which was established by an Agreement signed on October 18, 1969, in Kingston, Jamaica, and entered into force on January 26, 1970. The Bank came into existence for the purpose of contributing to the harmonious economic growth and development of the member countries in the Caribbean and promoting economic cooperation and integration among them, having special and urgent regard to the needs of the less developed members of the region (Article 1 of the Agreement establishing CDB). In the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, the CDB is recognised as an Associate Institution of CARICOM
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Commonwealth Secretary-General pledges to challenge development assistance rules

Commonwealth Secretary-General commits to ramping up advocacy for reformed development assistance rules
“But despite this great tragedy and unimaginable devastation, I saw in Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica an unbreakable spirit of resilience and revival. I was able to attend Independence celebrations in both countries. I heard the leaders deliver powerful speeches about rebuilding better, stronger and greener. These countries declared loudly ‘we are still standing and we will continue to rise up from this disaster’. But they need help.” – Commonwealth Secretary-General
Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland has promised to ramp up advocacy for the reform of development assistance rules which member states say are restricting aid to storm ravished countries in the Caribbean. The Secretary-General made the commitment at meetings with leaders in Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica during visits to the countries to discuss Commonwealth support after hurricanes Irma and Maria caused widespread devastation. Today she issued a statement about her trip to the islands.

The Secretary-General said, “I knew coming home to Antigua and Barbuda and Dominica was going to be difficult after hurricanes Irma and Maria, but nothing could have prepared me for what I saw or the stories I heard during my visits. Flying in to Dominica, I hardly recognised the country of my birth. Maria has devoured almost all its vegetation. The signature green that used to define this fertile breadbasket of the Caribbean is gone, replaced by brown, bald patches of land and naked trees, stripped of their barks. (more…)

President of Haiti calls for innovation, investment in energy sector

Caricom Energy Month Logo Theme 2017

The 2017 edition of the CARICOM Energy Month (CEM) got off to an impressive start on Monday, 30 October, in Port au Prince, with His Excellency Jovenel Moïse, the President Haiti, participating in the opening session of a symposium. The event launched the CEM and brought together many of the actors in Haiti’s energy sector.

In his assessment of the Haitian sector, the Haitian President declared that he intended to “make universal and reliable access to energy a key factor of economic development”. He highlighted the country’s potential to utilise and develop clean, renewable sources of energy.

 “But it’s not only a question of producing energy and making it accessible to people” said the President. “We also have to collect revenue. Energy cannot be free; everywhere in the world one has to pay for energy. This has to be properly reflected in our energy policy”.

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Climate Action and Trade Governance: Prospects for Tourism and Travel in Small Island Developing States

Damage in Barbuda after Hurricane Irma
Damage in Barbuda after Hurricane Irma

2017 will go down as a landmark year given the huge impact of hurricanes on the economic, social and ecological environments in the wider Caribbean. The decimation of several island territories, such as Dominica, Anguilla, Barbuda, St. Maarten, Turks and Caicos, US and British Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico have taken hundreds of lives and destroyed livelihoods in key sectors like tourism. Take the case of Dominica that had a direct hit from category 5 hurricane Maria on September 18, 2017.1 It is estimated that 35% of the reefs at dive sites in Dominica were damaged, and a month later only 43% of accommodation properties are operational. Hurricane Maria went on to hit Puerto Rico that is now facing a humanitarian crisis.2

The economic losses for the Caribbean are staggering. For instance, the initial estimates from damages by hurricane Irma are larger than the annual GDP of the smaller territories (see figure )3 — about 130% of the GDP for St. Maarten, 250% for St. Martin, 140% for the British Virgin Islands, 37% for Turks and Caicos, 95% for Anguilla, and 15% for Antigua and Barbuda. In contrast, the impact for larger territories like Florida and Cuba are 5.3% and 2.6%, respectively. This data illustrates how vulnerable small island developing states (SIDS) are to the environmental impact of climate change and how quickly these economies can accumulate high debt-to-GDP ratios because of the rebuilding costs from a weather disaster.4

Read more at: OECD Development Matters