Coconut industry benefits from CARDI project

Coconut heaven

Since the implementation of the Caribbean Coconut Industry Development Project two-and-a-half years ago, the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) has made several strides in improving the local coconut industry through training as well as the establishment of new nurseries among other targeted initiatives.

The four-year project was undertaken through a partnership between CARDI and the International Trade Centre (ITC), with funding provided by the European Union. It was aimed at improving income and employment opportunities, food security, and overall competitiveness of the Caribbean coconut sector.

Participating countries in the project include Jamaica, Belize, St Vincent and the Grenadines, St Lucia, and Suriname, among others in the region.

According to CARDI country representative for Jamaica Dr Gregory Robin, Jamaica has the most organised coconut industry board in the region and so a partnership was developed with the local Coconut Industry Board, which had established a national stakeholder platform that addresses all the issues along the value chain, from production to the manufacturing of coconut water, oils and soaps.

Read more at: Jamaica Observer

 

What does ‘climate-smart agriculture’ really mean? New tool breaks it down

Water catchment tank (IPS photo)

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, Aug 14 2017 (IPS) - A Trinidadian scientist has developed a mechanism for determining the degree of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) compliance with respect to projects, processes and products.

This comes as global attention is drawn to climate-smart agriculture as one of the approaches to mitigate or adapt to climate change.

Steve Maximay says his Climate-Smart Agriculture Compliant (C-SAC) tool provides a certification and auditing scheme that can be used to compare projects, processes and products to justify the applicability and quantum of climate change funding.

“C-SAC provides a step-by-step, checklist style guide that a trained person can use to determine how closely the project or process under review satisfies the five areas of compliance,” Maximay told IPS.

“This method literally forces the examiner to consider key aspects or goals of climate-smart agriculture. These aspects (categories) are resource conservation; energy use; safety; biodiversity support; and greenhouse gas reduction.”

Read more at: Inter Press Service

Spotlight on Youth in Agriculture – Anastasha Elliot

In our continuing series on Youth in Aariculture, we share the experiences of Anastasha Elliot of St. Kitts and Nevis. She is the winner of the Caribbean Category of the Youth Agripreneur Project hosted by the Global Forum for Agricultural Research (GFAR) and the Young Professionals for Agricultural Research and Development.
(YPARD)

113 graduate from Guyana School of Agriculture

Best overall graduating student, Ms. Narifa Mokhan recieving her award from Permanent Secretary (ag), Mrs Joylyn Nester-Burrowes
Best overall graduating student, Ms. Narifa Mokhan recieving her award from Permanent Secretary (ag), Mrs Joylyn Nester-Burrowes

The Guyana School of Agriculture (GSA) held its 53rd graduation exercised on 9 August 2017. The ceremony, at which 113 students were awarded in various capacities, was held at the school’s Plant Science Building, Mon Repos, East Coast, Demerara.

Progamme Manager, Agriculture and Industry, Ms. Nisa Surujbally, represented the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat.

Students graduated with Diplomas in Agriculture, Animal Health and Veterinary Public Health; Certificates in Agriculture and Forestry.

The best overall graduating students for each of the programmes offered are:

Nafira Mokhan – Diploma in Agriculture (Mon Repos campus) (more…)

 

Caribbean condiment exports heat up

Baron Foods Ltd. exports 50% of its production to over 25 countries (Photo via Spore)
Baron Foods Ltd. exports 50% of its production to over 25 countries (Photo via Spore)

From sweet preserves to spicy sauces, regional condiment agro-processers are investing in certification and standardisation in order to sustainably enter the highly developed international ethnic and gourmet export markets.

The value of the global condiment market is expected to rise to €20.29 billion by 2020, with urbanisation, higher disposable incomes, and growing interest in world cuisine increasing the demand for exotic sauces in North America and Europe. International sales of sauces and mixed condiments from Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries is less than €44 million, presenting an opportunity to harness the export and growth potential of Caribbean condiment brands and novel products.

The Caribbean’s main spice and condiment crops are hot peppers, nutmeg, mace, pimento, ginger and cinnamon, with key exports coming from Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago.

In the 1970s, Jamaica’s Busha Browne Company became the first regional agro-processor to export jerk seasoning (a spice mix native to Jamaica) to the US. Today the firm also exports to Australia, Canada, England and New Zealand. In fact, Jamaica recently took a giant step to support its jerk seasoning exporters’ by becoming the first English-speaking Caribbean country to register an indigenous product, ‘jerk’, under the international geographical indication system.

Read more at: Spore