‘We need you’ – Barbados Minister steers youth toward agriculture

Minister of Labour, Senator Dr. Esther Byer Suckoo and IICA Representative, Ena Harvey, presenting Shem Wilson of Antigua with his prizes for copping the Most Outstanding Student Award at the IICA graduation ceremony last Friday. (Photo via C.Pitt/BGIS)
Minister of Labour, Senator Dr. Esther Byer Suckoo and IICA Representative, Ena Harvey, presenting Shem Wilson of Antigua with his prizes for copping the Most Outstanding Student Award at the IICA graduation ceremony last Friday. (Photo via C.Pitt/BGIS)

Minister of Labour, Social Security and Human Resource Development, Senator Dr. Esther Byer Suckoo has re-iterated the importance of youth involvement in the future viability of the local agriculture sector.

She expressed this view recently while addressing the graduation ceremony of the Youth Farm 2016 held under the aegis of the Inter-American Institute on Cooperation in Agriculture, (IICA) in Building No.2, Harbour Industrial Estate, St. Michael.

Senator Byer Suckoo pointed out that while careers in medicine, pharmacy, plumbing, legal, engineering and information technology were important, so too were the skills of agricultural workers.

“My message to you [graduates] is simple – We need you. Whether it is [pursuing opportunities] as crop scientists, soil scientists, plant breeders, crop farmers, livestock farmers or greenhouse specialists, we need you all,” she insisted.

Read more at: Barbados Government Information Service

Spotlight on Youth in Agriculture – Maria Jackson

Lucian and proud! Today, in our continuing series on youth in agriculture, we feature Maria Jackson. Maria proves yet again the power of women in agriculture via her collaborative business model making her coca products stand out.
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People will know CARICOM is working when they see, taste, feel – The Bahamas Prime Minister

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New Prime Minister of The Bahamas delivering his inaugural address to the Conference
New Prime Minister of The Bahamas delivering his inaugural address to the Conference
“CARICOM is a community of the people we serve, not a club of officials and politicians. We need to cast our nets far and wide to engage the combined spirit and the collective brain-trust of the Region. We must blend various languages and accents in order to speak to the world with one voice about the aspirations of our people and the mission of CARICOM.” Dr. Hubert Minnis
Dr. The Hon. Hubert Minnis, Prime Minister of The Bahamas, has signalled his readiness to help deliver the mandates of CARICOM to provide better, healthier and more prosperous lives for the people of the Community.

In doing so, the newest Member of the Conference of Heads of Government also expressed confidence in organs and institutions of the Caribbean Community to deliver benefits of integration.

His inaugural address to the Community, at the opening of the 38th CARICOM Summit, in Grand Anse, Grenada, Tuesday evening, was punctuated with an urgent call for unity. (more…)

World Bank official urges Caribbean countries to transit to blue economy

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Jorge Familiar, Vice President, Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank. (Photo via CMC)
Jorge Familiar, Vice President, Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank. (Photo via CMC)

ST GEORGE’S, Grenada (CMC) — A senior official of the World Bank said Wednesday that Caribbean countries have been more successful in reinventing themselves than some of the region’s giants.

“This region managed to find a niche in the highly competitive global industry after it lost its trade preference treatment with Europe in the 1980s,” said Jorge Familiar, Vice President, Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank.

Addressing Caribbean Community (CARICOM) leaders at their 38th annual summit here on development finance opportunities for small states and how the blue economy has become the next frontier for economic growth for the Caribbean, Familiar noted that Grenada is demonstrating its commitment to inclusive growth and enhancing investment in the blue economy.

“Often when we meet to discuss development prospects for Caribbean countries, we devote significant attention to common challenges: small scale, high debt, exposure to external shocks, and dependency on fossil fuels,” he said, noting that small economies are more open to trade and foreign investment.

Read more at: Jamaica Observer

See full text of the address here