World leaders join new drive to beat non-communicable diseases

 WHO is announcing today a new high-level commission, comprised of heads of state and ministers, leaders in health and development and entrepreneurs. The group will propose bold and innovative solutions to accelerate prevention and control of the leading killers on the planet – noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like heart and lung disease, cancers, and diabetes.

The WHO Independent Global High-level Commission on NCDs is co-chaired by President Tabaré Vázquez of Uruguay; President Maithripala Sirisena of Sri Lanka; President Sauli Niinistö of Finland; Veronika Skvortsova, Minister of Healthcare of the Russian Federation; and Sania Nishtar, former Federal Minister of Pakistan.

Seven in 10 deaths globally every year are from NCDs, the main contributors to which are tobacco use, harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diets, and physical inactivity. More than 15 million people between the ages of 30 and 70 years die from NCDs annually. Low- and lower-middle income countries are increasingly affected, with half of premature deaths from NCDs occurring in those countries. Many lives can be saved from NCDs through early diagnosis and improved access to quality and affordable treatment, as well as a whole-of-government approach to reduce the main risk factors.

Read more at: World Health Organisation

UN Steps up Action to Make Urban Spaces More Climate-Resilient

UNFCCC photo for resilient cities article

UN Climate Change News, 15 February 2018 –  The 9th World Urban Forum in Kuala Lumpur concluded this week with a call to use the new urban agenda as an accelerator to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and support climate action.

According to the UN, the world’s urban population is expected to grow by 2.5 billion by 2050, with over 90 per cent of this growth to take place in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

This presents an unprecedented opportunity to re-define urban development, including inventing in livable, low-carbon and resilient cities.

Experts at the meeting recognized the fact that climate change will exacerbate the vulnerability of human settlements to natural and man-made hazards globally. This will especially be the case in developing countries, coastal and delta regions, and Small Island Developing States.

Read more at: United Nations Framework on Convention on Climate Change

Barbados businesses for exploratory mission in Guyana

A GROUP of Barbadian manufacturers and services exporters will be in Guyana this week to explore trade and market opportunities here.

The 10-member group which will be participating in the exploratory mission from February 11-14, are all recent graduates of the Barbados Investment & Development Corporation’s (BIDC) Export Readiness Training Programme, an initiative designed to equip new and potential exporters with the knowledge, tools and strategies to successfully expand their businesses into new markets.

The BIDC in a release stated that the companies are drawn from various sectors of the island’s economy including food and beverage; information technology services (particularly for medical services); building and construction; garments and fashion; footwear; media publishing and health and wellness sectors.

The group comprises AirtelCimTect Inc, Carepoint Solutions, Bibi’s Snacks Inc., Eve’s Creations, Locks Protector, Regal Elegance and Eastlanders Manufacturing (B’dos) Inc.

Read more at: Guyana Chronicle

‘Cricket in the West Indies is about building a sensibility for all’ – Sir Wes Hall

Sir Wesley Hall delivering the feature address (Photo by Ackeem Thomas via NewsRoom)
“…cricket in the West Indies is not a new development; its logic, its values, artistry, morality and spirit are very different from other cricket cultures. That is so true.” – Sir Wes Hall
In his prime he terrified batsmen the world over. Towering at 6’2” he was as good as they came- fast and accurate with a classical action.

Today at 80, he walks with the support of a cane; his strapping structure clearly weakened by the rigours of bowling at high speed against the finest batsmen, in the most intense of conditions.

“The human body was not designed for fast bowling,” Sir Wesley Winfield Hall told a gathering at the Pegasus Hotel on Friday evening.

“We either die early or we walk with a cane or with two mock knees, but we don’t do very well after bowling for a long time,” he continued.

Read more at: NewsRoom