Jamaica’s CSME official updated on Barbados’ progress

Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister, Senator Darcy Boyce (centre) meets Jamaica’s CSME Focal Point, Symone Betton-Nayo (right) on the first day of a five-day visit to Barbados under the 10th European Development Fund. Also present were: (from left) Economist I, Rhea Clarke-Mason; Chief Research Officer, Paula Byer; Permanent Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office, Sonja Welch and Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris. Missing is Permanent Secretary (Defence and Security), Timothy Maynard. (Photo by A. Miller via BGIS)
Minister in the Office of the Prime Minister, Senator Darcy Boyce (centre) meets Jamaica’s CSME Focal Point, Symone Betton-Nayo (right) on the first day of a five-day visit to Barbados under the 10th European Development Fund. Also present were: (from left) Economist I, Rhea Clarke-Mason; Chief Research Officer, Paula Byer; Permanent Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office, Sonja Welch and Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris. (Photo by A. Miller via BGIS)

Barbados is doing its part to ensure that this country meets its obligations under the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME).

This was underscored recently by Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, Senator Darcy Boyce, as he met with Jamaica’s CARICOM Single Market and Economy Focal Point representative, Symone Betton-Nayo.  Mrs. Betton-Nayo is in Barbados on a five-day official visit as part of an internship exchange programme which is organised by the CARICOM Secretariat in association with the Prime Minister’s Office.

The meeting, which took place at Government Headquarters, was chaired by Minister Boyce, and included Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris; Permanent Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office, Sonja Welch; Permanent Secretary (Defence and Security), Timothy Maynard; and Chief Research Officer, Paula Byer.

In his remarks, Senator Boyce said: “I am one of the people who believe that the [CARICOM] Community is developing very nicely from the background of the number of people we process through our airport who go in and out without difficulties. From the number of CSN’s (CARICOM Skilled Nationals) that we issue and the very few that we reject.”

Jamaica’s CARICOM Single Market and Economy Focal Point representative, Symone Betton-Nayo with Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris. (Photo by A. Miller via BGIS)
Jamaica’s CARICOM Single Market and Economy Focal Point representative, Symone Betton-Nayo with Barbados’ Ambassador to CARICOM, Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris. (Photo by A. Miller via BGIS)

Read more at: Barbados Government Information Service

Work moves apace to develop Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code

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A Regional Project Team (RPT), established to develop a Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code (REEBC), among other mandates, will be launched in Kingston, Jamaica, next week.

The launch and the first face-to-face Working Meeting with the contracted consultant will be held 30-31 March, at the Jamaica Bureau of Standards. Nine Member States – Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, The Bahamas, Belize, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago – are represented on the RPT which consists of 19 Members.

The RPT is tasked with developing the REEBC, as well as its associated application documents and Minimum Energy Performance standards for buildings. To do so, the RPT will review the Minimum Energy Performance Standards for buildings as proposed by consultant, Solar Dynamics, in their final report of the consultancy on the Development of Minimum Energy Performance Standard (MEPS) for public and commercial buildings in CARICOM Member States. The team will also review the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in an effort to adapt it, where necessary, and present for acceptance and adoption by Member States as a Regional Energy Efficiency Building Code. (more…)

Introducing banana pasta

Tonya Ifill preparing another batch of green bananas. (Photo by Ricardo Leacock via Barbados Nation)
Tonya Ifill preparing another batch of green bananas. (Photo by Ricardo Leacock via Barbados Nation)
‘Anything you do with normal flour you can do with banana flour. You are replacing the white flour with a healthy alternative. It has a sweet taste but there’s no sugar. I’ve found that when you dry out products, you get a little sweetness.’ – Tonya Ifill
IF ONE ENTREPRENEUR has her way, more consumers will be setting aside their wheat, cassava and sweet potato products for those made with green bananas.

Tonya Ifill, owner and operator of Carlesa’s Enterprises pioneered flour and pasta made from the unripened fruit. Ifill was attending Agrofest when she spoke with BARBADOS BUSINESS AUTHORITY.

She got the idea while participating in an agro-processing course at the Guyana School of Agriculture. As a group project, participants had to come up with a product that was new to the South American country.

“I did sweet potato and brown rice pasta and got my cousin to export a pasta machine from Canada and I was ready. When I came back [to Barbados], I was looking for something different to work with instead of the same sweet potato and cassava. I researched green bananas, asked around for some and started my trials and it took off from there,” she said.

Read more at: Barbados Nation

CDB funds project to prevent loss of correspondent banking relationships

March 17, 2017, BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – The Board of Directors of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) has approved funding of US$250,000 to strengthen financial transparency, and assist in preventing the loss of correspondent banking relationships (CBRs) in the Region.

In the Caribbean, CBRs facilitate a number of payment systems, including international trade, cross-border payments and receiving of remittances. Recently, some large international banks have started terminating or severely limiting their CBRs with smaller local and regional banks, in an effort to reduce exposure to risks associated with money-laundering and financing of terrorism. This process, known as de-risking, has negative implications for the Caribbean, potentially resulting the loss of trade relationships and negative economic impacts.

CBRs are fundamental to the efficient operation and resilience of the global financial system. This project will contribute to a more stable financial system in the Caribbean, which will in turn allow more banks to access CBRs, so that they can continue to carry out international transactions. This is critical if the Caribbean is to reduce poverty and spur economic development,” said Daniel Best, Director of Projects at the CDB. (more…)