Why is Grenada similar to and different from the Seychelles or other small economies?

Grenada (Photo via the World Bank)
Grenada (Photo via the World Bank)

A dreamy holiday destination for sun lovers and beach goers, Grenada, also called the “Spice Island,” is home to over 100,000 people. With an ocean area 80 times larger than its land space, a rich and pristine coastline and colorful coral reefs driving its tourism industry, and a real understanding of climate risks, this Eastern Caribbean Island has recently positioned itself as a real blue economy champion in the region. Over 13,000 kilometers west, another small island developing state in the Western Indian Ocean with similar challenges and opportunities—the Seychelles—is also leading on the blue agenda.

What common challenges and opportunities are facing small economies? What can the World Bank contribute to generate stable growth in small economies? These are key questions raised in recent conversations in the Caribbean and Washington.

Grenada Prime Minister Keith Mitchell, recently appointed as chair of the World Bank Group Small States Forum taking over from Seychelles Minister of Finance Jean-Paul Adam, called for the need to change the narrative from big to small, and in doing so, address opportunities for small states.

Read more at: The World Bank

Working together – CARICOM SG, Ambassadors and Heads of Community Institutions

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Work to strengthen the Region’s governance and implementation structures continued Thursday with the first joint meeting of the CARICOM Secretary-General, Heads of Community Institutions and the CARICOM Committee of Ambassadors  at the Pegasus Hotel, Georgetown, Guyana.

Thursday’s exchanges followed the fifth Meeting of the Committee of Ambassadors, held at the CARICOM Secretariat, also in Georgetown, on Wednesday. The Committee plays an important role in the governance structure of the Community, providing strategic advice and recommendations to the Community Council towards advancing the integration movement.

The Heads of Community Institutions  meet regularly with the Secretary-General to seek to harmonise efforts towards implementation of the CARICOM Strategic Plan.

Several participants joined the meeting via video conference.

 

CDF Head calls on President Granger

President David Granger and Chief Executive Officer of the Caribbean Development Fund, Mr. Rodinald Soomer at State House (Photo via Ministry of the Presidency)
President David Granger and Chief Executive Officer of the Caribbean Development Fund, Mr. Rodinald Soomer at State House (Photo via Ministry of the Presidency)

Ministry of the Presidency, Georgetown, Guyana, May 3, 2017 – President David Granger, (on Wednesday), met with Chief Executive Officer of the Caribbean Development Fund (CDF), Mr. Rodinald Soomer, who lauded Guyana for its excellent track record in paying its contribution to the organisation as well as implementation of development projects. The meeting was held at State House.

The CDF is a 12-member body established under Article 158 of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas signed in January 2001. The Agreement Relating to the Operations of the Fund was signed in July 2008 and the CDF began operating in August 2009. Its objective is to assist its members to maximise the benefits arising from participation in the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) by reducing intra-regional disparities through effective partnerships and the provision of financial and technical assistance. Its members include Guyana, Suriname, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Trinidad and Tobago.

Last year, Guyana signed its second financing agreement for a blended loan facility with the CDF valued at US$10,432,263.

Border security professional exchange launched in Barbados

 

(Photo via US Embassy in Barbados)
(Photo via US Embassy in Barbados)

PRESS RELEASE – United States Customs and Border Protection hosted a Border Security Professional Exchange with CARICOM Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) member states and regional partners focused on issues of mutual concern related to border management throughout the Caribbean.

The three-day exchange was funded by the United States Department of State under the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative.

The exchange was designed to increase collaboration between international partners and the United States government on border security. Subject matter experts led robust and productive discussions on topics such as foreign terrorist fighters, border security, migration trends, and countering criminal networks.

Participants included leaders working in customs, immigration, and police operations, as well as permanent secretaries from the following CARICOM member states: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. Additional participants included border security professionals from the Dominican Republic, Panama, and the United States; as well as the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and those two nations’ respective overseas territories.

Read more at: St. Lucia News Online

In emotional service, Jesuits and Georgetown repent for slave trading

“We express our solemn contrition for our participation in slavery, and the benefit our institution received. We cannot hide from this truth, bury this truth, ignore this truth. Slavery remains the original evil in our republic, an evil that our university was complicit in.” – President, Georgetown University, John DeGioia
(CNN) There is wide gulf, Frederick Douglass wrote in 1845, between Christianity proper and the “slaveholding religion of this land.” One is “good, pure and holy,” the other corrupt and wicked, the “climax of all misnomers, the boldest of all frauds.”

“We have men-stealers for ministers, women-whippers for missionaries and cradle-plunderers for church members,” Douglass wrote in “Life of an American Slave.”

For Douglass, as for other African-Americans, the sin of slavery was intolerable; the complicity of Christians unforgivable.

On both counts, the Jesuit order, one of the Catholic Church’s most powerful group of priests, (Pope Francis is a member) was guilty. In the United States and elsewhere, the Society of Jesus owned and sold slaves.

 

Read more at: CNN