Assessing vulnerability to climate change in Montserrat’s fisheries sector

Fish landing site. (Photo via Natalie Boodram, CANARI)

Brades, February 19, 2018 –  The Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Trade, Housing, Lands and Environment (MATHLE) will be working with stakeholders from the public sector, civil society, including fisherfolk and their organisations, and the private sector to assess the vulnerability of Montserrat’s fisheries sector to climate change and natural disasters.

From February 18 -24, these stakeholders will build a scaled, three-dimensional model of Montserrat that captures local and scientific knowledge on resource use, livelihoods and areas critical to the fisheries sector, such as landing sites and fishing grounds, to assess vulnerability to climate change and identify potential adaptation actions.  As part of this exercise, an action plan for climate change adaptation in the fisheries sector will be produced.  A GIS map and database to support spatial planning and decision-making on land use and sustainable fisheries development will also be developed.

The workshop is being conducted under the Darwin Plus: Overseas Territories Environment and Climate Fund project, Climate change adaptation in the fisheries of Anguilla and Montserrat.  CANARI, the Fisheries and Ocean Resources Unit, MATHLE – Montserrat, Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources – Anguilla and the Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies (CERMES) of the University of the West Indies are implementing the three-year project, from 2017-2020.  The overall goal of the project is to mainstream climate change adaptation into fisheries governance and management in Anguilla and Montserrat using an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF).

About the Project
Anguilla and Montserrat are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and variability, such as increased sea surface temperature, intensity of storms and sea level rise, which are expected to trigger a complex series of biophysical and socio-economic impacts on fisheries. Climate change adaptation (CCA) is therefore crucial. The three-year (April 1917 – March 2020) Darwin Plus funded (£260,925) Climate Change Adaptation in the Fisheries of Anguilla and Montserrat project is aimed at mainstreaming CCA into fisheries governance, using an ecosystem approach to fisheries, which should result in improved resilience and sustainability of fisheries, associated livelihoods and conservation of the marine environment in Anguilla and Montserrat. The project is being implemented by CANARI in partnership with the Department of Fisheries and Marine Resources – Anguilla, Fisheries and Ocean Resources Unit – Montserrat and CERMES. See here for more information: http://www.canari.org/climate-change-adaptation-in-the-fisheries-of-anguilla-and-montserrat.
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UN Steps up Action to Make Urban Spaces More Climate-Resilient

UNFCCC photo for resilient cities article

UN Climate Change News, 15 February 2018 –  The 9th World Urban Forum in Kuala Lumpur concluded this week with a call to use the new urban agenda as an accelerator to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and support climate action.

According to the UN, the world’s urban population is expected to grow by 2.5 billion by 2050, with over 90 per cent of this growth to take place in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

This presents an unprecedented opportunity to re-define urban development, including inventing in livable, low-carbon and resilient cities.

Experts at the meeting recognized the fact that climate change will exacerbate the vulnerability of human settlements to natural and man-made hazards globally. This will especially be the case in developing countries, coastal and delta regions, and Small Island Developing States.

Read more at: United Nations Framework on Convention on Climate Change

Japan funding to help women in Guyana, Dominica deal with disasters

At the signing ceremony at the Guyana Ministry of Finance Thursday afternoon (Photo via News Room)

The Government of Japan is contributing US$5 million to help rural women in Guyana and Dominica, particularly those engaged in agriculture, withstand the effects of climate change.

At the Ministry of Finance Thursday afternoon, Minister of Finance Winston Jordan signed the project documents with the United Nations Development Programme for the Japan-funded project.

A portion of the US$5 million project will be used in Guyana over the next three years. It is intended to help poor farmers, especially women, to withstand the negative impacts of climate change.

“As such, the project will focus, primarily, on women, whom, perhaps, are the most vulnerable section of the population that is exposed during droughts, floods, hurricanes and other severe weather conditions.

Read more at: News Room

SIDS must never be denied concessional financing for climate resilience -SG

 

CARICOM Secretary-General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque
CARICOM Secretary-General, Ambassador Irwin LaRocque

Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque has called for the scaling up of climate finance for resilience in the health sector.

He also posited that small vulnerable countries must never be denied access to concessional financing in their quest for resilience against climate change.

These were among the issues he addressed recently, while speaking at the inauguration ceremony for the second term in office of Dr. Carissa Etienne, Director of the Pan American Organisation (PAHO). The ceremony was held 1 February at PAHO Headquarters in Washington D.C.

With Small Island Developing States (SIDS) on the front line, he said: “The WHO has recognised that climate change is one of the greatest threats to human health and the environment, as it affects the social and environmental determinants of health – clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and secure shelter.” (more…)

CDB President announces up to US$800M for disaster recovery, amid strong Bank performance in 2017

Dr. Warren Smith, President of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)

February 7, 2018, BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – President of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), Dr. Wm. Warren Smith, today announced that the institution is making USD700 to 800 million (mn) available to help Borrowing Member Countries (BMCs) recover from the impact of the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season. The funding, which the Bank is providing over the next five years, complements its ongoing work to build resilience in the Caribbean Region.

 “Disaster risk management and resilience building took centre-stage again in CDB’s strategic responses to the challenges facing our BMCs,” said Smith while outlining the Bank’s 2017 performance during his Annual News Conference on February 7, 2018.

“To incentivise BMCs to invest in climate-resilient infrastructure, CDB must be able to also offer grant and other attractively priced financial resources. But the challenges our Region faces are bigger than what CDB can handle on its own. We have, therefore, been drawing on a combination of our own resources as well as funds intermediated through CDB by other development partners to meet this challenge,” he added.

In 2017, the Bank mobilised concessionary resources from development partners to support more resilient infrastructure projects throughout the Region.

Caribbean Development Bank
The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), is a regional financial institution which was established by an Agreement signed on October 18, 1969, in Kingston, Jamaica, and entered into force on January 26, 1970. The Bank came into existence for the purpose of contributing to the harmonious economic growth and development of the member countries in the Caribbean and promoting economic cooperation and integration among them, having special and urgent regard to the needs of the less developed members of the region (Article 1 of the Agreement establishing CDB). In the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, the CDB is recognised as and Associate Institution of CARICOM.
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