Coconut boost for Barbados, Region

More-coconuts-974x365 BGIS

Barbados and the region can have a bustling coconut industry, despite being smaller than major growers such as Indonesia and The Philippines.

This assertion was made by Maurice Wilson, who is the Regional Coconut Industry Coordinator at the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI).

He was speaking with the Barbados Government Information Service (BGIS) following the inaugural meeting of the National Stakeholders Platform (NSP) on the coconut industry, recently held at the Ministry of Agriculture’s Graeme Hall offices.

Barbados is among 11 CARIFORUM countries participating in a European Union (EU)-funded Caribbean Coconut Industry Development project. The Euro 4 million project, being executed by CARDI, is geared towards enhancing the competitiveness of the region’s coconut industry, thereby ensuring food security, creating jobs and generating revenue.

Mr. Wilson gave an overview of the undertaking, and noted that the Caribbean’s coconut industry was thrown into a tailspin decades ago, after coconut oil was deemed unhealthy. “In the 1970s, the coconut industry in the region virtually collapsed, because there was a soya bean lobby, which indicated that coconut oil was bad for the system.

Read more at: Barbados Government Information Service

Barbados Moves Closer To Coconut Industry

(Photo via BGIS)

Barbados has taken an all-inclusive approach to developing its coconut industry.

Growers, vendors, processors, and agricultural officials met at the Ministry of Agriculture’s Graeme Hall, Christ Church office, this morning, for the inaugural meeting of the Barbados National Stakeholders Platform (NSP) on coconuts.

The discussion, which touched on several pertinent areas, was held by the Ministry, in collaboration with the Caribbean Agricultural Research Development Institute (CARDI) and the Barbados Society of Technologists in Agriculture (BSTA).

Barbados is among 11 Caribbean countries engaged in the Coconut Industry Development for the Caribbean Project, funded by the European Union at a cost of 4 million Euro, and executed by CARDI.  It was required that they set up NSPs.

According to CARDI’s Regional Coconut Industry Coordinator, Maurice Wilson, information from the NSP will help inform decisions in the developmental process.

“The National Stakeholder Platform is the mechanism by which the project could be managed and coordinated nationally and move forward,” he said.

Read more at: Barbados Government Information Service

Coconut industry benefits from CARDI project

Coconut heaven

Since the implementation of the Caribbean Coconut Industry Development Project two-and-a-half years ago, the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) has made several strides in improving the local coconut industry through training as well as the establishment of new nurseries among other targeted initiatives.

The four-year project was undertaken through a partnership between CARDI and the International Trade Centre (ITC), with funding provided by the European Union. It was aimed at improving income and employment opportunities, food security, and overall competitiveness of the Caribbean coconut sector.

Participating countries in the project include Jamaica, Belize, St Vincent and the Grenadines, St Lucia, and Suriname, among others in the region.

According to CARDI country representative for Jamaica Dr Gregory Robin, Jamaica has the most organised coconut industry board in the region and so a partnership was developed with the local Coconut Industry Board, which had established a national stakeholder platform that addresses all the issues along the value chain, from production to the manufacturing of coconut water, oils and soaps.

Read more at: Jamaica Observer

 

Coconuts – new frontier for food and nutrition security, reducing poverty

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On the beachfront grounds of the White House in Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands, Derik engages delegates to the Caribbean Week of Agriculture and divulges his obviously vast knowledge of all that coconuts have to offer.

Derik is effusive. He’s a proponent, a champion of coconuts.

His perfectly packaged coconut flour, perched on a makeshift stand in the sand, catches the eye. A single question launches an extensive, interesting conversation.

He massages with a coconut paste that leaves the unsuspecting forearm refreshingly light, silky, tingly.

He swears another concoction has the effect of botox. “Take a smell. How does it smell?” he asks. (more…)