Japan funding to help women in Guyana, Dominica deal with disasters

At the signing ceremony at the Guyana Ministry of Finance Thursday afternoon (Photo via News Room)

The Government of Japan is contributing US$5 million to help rural women in Guyana and Dominica, particularly those engaged in agriculture, withstand the effects of climate change.

At the Ministry of Finance Thursday afternoon, Minister of Finance Winston Jordan signed the project documents with the United Nations Development Programme for the Japan-funded project.

A portion of the US$5 million project will be used in Guyana over the next three years. It is intended to help poor farmers, especially women, to withstand the negative impacts of climate change.

“As such, the project will focus, primarily, on women, whom, perhaps, are the most vulnerable section of the population that is exposed during droughts, floods, hurricanes and other severe weather conditions.

Read more at: News Room

BVI Gov’t prepares for another possible active hurricane season

The British Virgin Islands after Hurricane Irma last year

The Government of the BVI has initiated a plan to get ready for what may be another active season, according to the preliminary predictions released in December 2017.

According to the Department of Disaster Management (DDM), the commencement of the 2018 hurricane season is just about three months away and residents of the BVI are being asked to utilise this off-season to get their homes and businesses repaired and ready.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from 1st June to 30th November.

Director of DDM, Sharleen DaBreo while speaking about the ongoing preparations being made said that they have commenced a detailed inspection of the Emergency Shelters that were officially designated in 2017 and they are also looking at other facilities that were used during the passage of Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Read more at: BVI Platinum News

Help SIDS to help themselves – PM Chastanet issues call at COP23

“I call on developed countries to help SIDS help themselves. We cannot wait till 2020 to see finance to deal with the emergency situations, build resilience in our countries as far as possible, and the loss and damage that is already occurring.

“Our people have proven to be and will continue to be resilient. But here, on the international level, I say to you: all it takes is a pen; a pen to create the policies to prioritise the resources; a pen to change the protocols used to disperse funds; a pen to change macroeconomic targets, realising that we cannot invest in resilience without putting our counties into deeper economic volatility. This means that the frameworks we have under this process must be sensitive to the urgent needs of SIDS … and not simply wrapped up in bureaucracy.” – Prime Minister of Saint Lucia, the Jon. Allen Chastanet, Lead Head of Government in the CARICOM Quasi Cabinet with responsibility for Sustainable Development, including the Environment and Disaster Management and Water, at COP 23

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Building back better: The Caribbean’s wind of change

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British billionaire Richard Branson called it a Marshall Plan for the Caribbean.

Antigua & Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne called it ”building on a sustainable basis in order to limit the impact” of future natural disaster.

Whatever it’s going to be called, Caribbean leaders, planners and citizens are increasingly talking about the need for a fresh approach to coping with all that Mother Nature has to throw at their archipelago of territories, prone to geo-faults and cross-Atlantic high winds.

Immediately after Hurricane Irma had wiped out most of Barbuda, St Lucia’s Prime Minister Allen Chastanet was part of the first delegation to arrive in Antigua.

Read more at: CaribbeanIntelligence