Better fish catches touted among benefits of novel CARIFICO project

A 700-pound Blue Marlin caught around the FADs in Saint Lucia, one of the pilot countries

BELIZE CITY, BELIZE, Monday, 11 December 2017 (CRFM)—The Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) and its partners at the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) recently held a wrap-up meeting in Saint Lucia at which the outcomes of the novel Caribbean Fisheries Co-Management Project (CARIFICO) were unveiled. The most important benefits underscored are better catches and improved incomes for fishers who began using Fish Aggregating Devices or FADs. These were designed, constructed, deployed and managed in a cooperative manner by the fishers themselves in collaboration with government officials and with support from the Japanese experts.

Fishers from the pilot countries attended the meeting in Saint Lucia and shared how the project has positively impacted them. Fisheries officials from the CARICOM countries, except for Bahamas and Belize, also attended. International partners from JICA, fisheries experts deployed in the region and officials from JICA headquarters in Japan, as well as representatives from the Embassy of Japan in Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribbean Network of Fisherfolk Organisation, the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), and the University of Florida were also present.

CRFM Executive Director Milton Haughton said that he was impressed with the progress made in introducing co-management approaches in specific fisheries, as well as the level of investment of fishers in the process. Fishers have formed new fisherfolk organisations which are actively participating in the development and management of the target fisheries as a result of the CARIFICO project. Through the project, governments in the six pilot countries are sharing more authority and responsibility for fisheries development and management with stakeholders by improving relations and communications, and promoting increased participation by them in decision-making in fisheries.

Participants at the forum
Participants at the forum

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113 graduate from Guyana School of Agriculture

Best overall graduating student, Ms. Narifa Mokhan recieving her award from Permanent Secretary (ag), Mrs Joylyn Nester-Burrowes
Best overall graduating student, Ms. Narifa Mokhan recieving her award from Permanent Secretary (ag), Mrs Joylyn Nester-Burrowes

The Guyana School of Agriculture (GSA) held its 53rd graduation exercised on 9 August 2017. The ceremony, at which 113 students were awarded in various capacities, was held at the school’s Plant Science Building, Mon Repos, East Coast, Demerara.

Progamme Manager, Agriculture and Industry, Ms. Nisa Surujbally, represented the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat.

Students graduated with Diplomas in Agriculture, Animal Health and Veterinary Public Health; Certificates in Agriculture and Forestry.

The best overall graduating students for each of the programmes offered are:

Nafira Mokhan – Diploma in Agriculture (Mon Repos campus) (more…)

 

Caribbean condiment exports heat up

Baron Foods Ltd. exports 50% of its production to over 25 countries (Photo via Spore)
Baron Foods Ltd. exports 50% of its production to over 25 countries (Photo via Spore)

From sweet preserves to spicy sauces, regional condiment agro-processers are investing in certification and standardisation in order to sustainably enter the highly developed international ethnic and gourmet export markets.

The value of the global condiment market is expected to rise to €20.29 billion by 2020, with urbanisation, higher disposable incomes, and growing interest in world cuisine increasing the demand for exotic sauces in North America and Europe. International sales of sauces and mixed condiments from Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries is less than €44 million, presenting an opportunity to harness the export and growth potential of Caribbean condiment brands and novel products.

The Caribbean’s main spice and condiment crops are hot peppers, nutmeg, mace, pimento, ginger and cinnamon, with key exports coming from Belize, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Trinidad and Tobago.

In the 1970s, Jamaica’s Busha Browne Company became the first regional agro-processor to export jerk seasoning (a spice mix native to Jamaica) to the US. Today the firm also exports to Australia, Canada, England and New Zealand. In fact, Jamaica recently took a giant step to support its jerk seasoning exporters’ by becoming the first English-speaking Caribbean country to register an indigenous product, ‘jerk’, under the international geographical indication system.

Read more at: Spore